3 reasons to rely on post cards for nonprofit direct mail

15 Jul

Last week I got an email from the good folks at Eleventy Marketing Group and in it was an article titled, 6 Significant Statistics From The DMA On The Current State Of Direct Mail.

The article lists the stats as mentioned and among them the most interesting potential impact to nonprofits using direct mail was this one:

postcard

 

So, all ages would prefer postcards from nonprofits. In an age where direct mail is shrinking but not going away anytime soon here’s 3 reasons why your nonprofit should take this report finding to heart.

Number 1 – It’s what’s preferred

I know this is kind of a “DUH!” reason but it goes a bit deeper. I believe the reason that postcards are preferred to, say, a 4 page appeal letter is that the content is bite-sized just like social media.

The trend to small content is driven by info-overload for sure but it’s also driven by where our eyeballs are focused throughout the day-our phones. Although people may spend an hour on Facebook they’re looking at small bites of content.

Small content in the digital and social worlds is driving interest in postcards from nonprofits versus longer more “engaging” direct mail content.

Number 2 – It’s cheaper

Even an alien landing on Earth would quickly learn that the United States Postal Service is in trouble financially. Rates will always go up just as the limits on the weight of the mail drop.

A postcard is about as simple, lightweight and cost-effective as can be.

Number 3 – It could be super effective

I know what your nonprofit is thinking-“how do I get a donation without a form and a return envelope? How do I tell the story of our mission on a postcard?”

Here’s how.

When the postcard recipient sees your postcard should have these elements on it to take a gift in that very moment the recipient looks at your postcard:

  • A shortened URL for entry into the recipients phone that leads to a mobile-optimized giving page
  • A QR code for the same URL as above
  • A text message call-to-action that will deliver the URL above

And also add in:

  • All of your social links
  • An email address of who to contact about large gifts

Yes, the postcard should have graphics and copy which talk about your mission/successes/challenges but in the moment that they feel compelled to give I can almost guarantee you 100% of the time the postcard recipient’s phone is at arm’s length.

Not their checkbook and not their PC. Their phone. Take advantage of this with secure and frictionless giving via smartphones.

We’ve seen these 3 ways to give work very well for the United Way. Increasingly your social media content is where supporters, new and existing, go to get your content. Drive folks there.

The weight of an envelope full of paper can feel daunting and too engaging for a supporter when they get their mail. A postcard is the right size as Eleventy points out and with secure, frictionless mobile giving just a few seconds away, postcards are the way to effectively ride direct mail into the sunset for your nonprofit.

Dale Knoop leads a great team working to make RAZ Mobile a powerful platform for any cause engaged in fundraising. Today, all causes need a content-rich mobile presence that can be shared through text messages, social media, email and more and best of all-quickly and securely process 100% of donations from motivated supporters with a minimum of friction in seconds with no passwords. If your nonprofit needs custom development of a mobile solution to fit your mission please click here. Dale holds multiple patents and applications for patent in the mobile space.

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